Spring Term 2022

Der interdisziplinäre Blick auf eine vielfältige Auswahl von Themen mit Bezug zu Berlin, Deutschland und Europa prägt die Kurse. Die meisten beinhalten Exkursionen in der Stadt Berlin. Studierende wählen entweder fünf Seminare aus, oder vier Seminare und einen Deutschsprachkurs.

Die Kurse dauern vierzehn Wochen, mit drei Unterrichtsstunden (jeweils 45 Min.) pro Woche. Die Unterrichtszeiten sind täglich von 9:00-11:30 Uhr, 12:30-15:00 Uhr und 16:00-18:30 Uhr. Den vorläufigen Stundenplan finden Sie auf dieser Webseite. Die Kurszeiten können sich ggf. noch verändern.

Da die Kurse generell englischsprachig stattfinden, sind die Inhaltsbeschreibungen nur in englischer Sprache verfügbar.
Deutsche SpracheGeschichteKulturwissenschaften und MigrationsforschungLiteratur und PhilosophieRecht und PolitikStadtforschung und Ökologie

Deutsche Sprache

Dozentin/Dozent
Wird noch bekannt gegeben
Sprachanforderung
Deutsch A0
Zeit
Mittwoch, 9:00-11:30
Kursbeschreibung
In diesem Kurs werden Grundlagen der Grammatik und ein erster Wortschatz erarbeitet und eingeübt, so dass einfache Alltagskommunikation in deutscher Sprache gelingt. Die Grundlagen der Konjugation von Verben und der Gebrauch der Artikel in der deutschen Sprache sind Gegenstand dieses Kurses auf A1-Niveau. Sie lernen sich vorzustellen und einfache Satzkonstruktionen zu bilden. Ein Schwerpunkt liegt auf der mündlichen Sprachkompetenz, die mit Hilfe interaktiver Methoden gefördert wird. Auch landeskundliche Themen werden dabei vermittelt.

Geschichte

Dozentin/Dozent
Prof. Dr. Jochen Hille / Stefka Wiese
Sprachanforderung
Englisch B2
Zeit
Montag, 16:00-18:30
Kursbeschreibung
In two World Wars, Germany tried to dominate the globe in the first half of the 20th century, and all major decisions were made in the capital Berlin: Why was Germany such an aggressive power until 1945? How did Hitler manage to gain and keep power? Why were many Germans Nazis and deeply racist? How was the life of ordinary people during the war? Why did the Nazis kill millions of Jews and other innocent people in concentration camps? What were the long term effects of World War II? What happened to the Nazis after the war? The course will provide answers to such questions via readings of texts from political science, sociology and history, while also taking the opportunity to explore the grounds on which the events between 1933 and 1945 took place.

Kulturwissenschaften und Migrationsforschung

Dozentin/Dozent
Dr. Victoria BISHOP KENDZIA
Sprachanforderung
Englisch B2
Zeit
Donnerstag, 9:00-11:30
Kursbeschreibung
Berlin’s rich museological landscape lends itself to in-depth exploration: How are the upheavals of the 20th and 21st centuries remembered and represented? How can the urban landscape be read as a myriad of dynamic sites? What do these sites, in turn, tell us about past traumas and present-day issues? This course aims to enable the students to get to know a number of Berlin museums focusing on key aspects of memory of the Second World War and Post-WWII migration, using anthropological methods. Students are encouraged to critically analyze these representations within larger theoretical frameworks of “self” and “other” constructions, exploring the role of museums in rendering such constructions visible.
Dozentin/Dozent
Dr. Deniz Güneş YARDIMCI
Sprachanforderung
Englisch B2
Zeit
Dienstag, 16:00-18:30
Kursbeschreibung
The labor migration from Southern European countries to Germany, which started in the mid-1950s, had an important socio-economic and socio-cultural impact on the countries’ societies and influenced their film culture. German filmmakers began to feature the first guestworkers’ difficult lives in films such as Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Katzelmacher (1969). In the 1990s, second and third generation Turkish-German directors such as Fatih Akın and Thomas Arslan marked the end of the so-called ‘guestworker cinema’ and started to create a transnational and diasporic cinema featuring a culturally hybrid Germany. Berlin (especially Kreuzberg) has always been one of the favorite settings in all of these migration movies. The transformation of Berlin’s first Guestworker Ghettos to culturally hybrid urban districts over the course of 60 years is very well reflected in all of these cinema cultures. This interdisciplinary course crosses and connects the academic fields of migration studies, film studies, and cultural studies. In the first part of the course, we will explore how migration, immigrants, and diasporas are represented in cinema. The second part of the course then gets more specific and we approach the representation of Berlin in these migration movies.

Literatur und Philosophie

Dozentin/Dozent
Anna Katharina NEUFELD
Sprachanforderung
Englisch B2
Zeit
Donnerstag, 12:30-15:00
Kursbeschreibung
What color has Berlin asks the German author David Wagner and alludes to Berlin’s manifold corners and “Kieze”, that reveal the cities potential and charm to walk through. Berlin is a multi-layered space that withholds a special concentration of chronicles and memories, narratives and myths. Numerous writers and film makers have tried to capture this heterogeneity, presenting its visibilities and invisibilities and staging Berlin in diverse ways. In the seminar we want to access Berlin by two approaches. On the one hand, we want to enter the city via texts and films, following the many ways writers and film makers have seen and experienced Berlin. The attempt to read the city through the eyes of the protagonists, narrators or cameras gives us the opportunity to walk through different historical periods, imagine various perspectives and reflect these regarding the question: Was and is that Berlin? On the other hand, the course aims to expand these perceptions with our own views and experiences. Becoming a flaneur ourselves, we want to observe and encounter the urban space. Taking up excursions to a number of places and scenes we have read about, the students are assigned to write shorts essays on their observations, including the ‘knowledge’ they took from the readings we do in class.
Dozentin/Dozent
Benjamin WILCK
Sprachanforderung
Englisch B2
Zeit
Donnerstag, 16:00-18:30
Kursbeschreibung
This course explores philosophical reflections on the structure and purpose of the university and the role of philosophy within that institution as put forward by German philosophers in the Prussian Berlin of the 19th century, while also providing a critical perspective on the subsequent history of the university through the 20th century until today. The University of Berlin was founded in 1809/10 following a series of philosophical university reform writings. Wilhelm von Humboldt in particular had the idea to create a new kind of university in which teaching and research would form a unity, in which science would be independent of political interests, and in which students would receive a universal education. Consequently, the University of Berlin became the paradigm of a new era of teaching and research. By reading key texts by Kant, Schelling, Fichte, von Humboldt, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Marx, Heine, Schopenhauer, Heidegger, and Rosa Luxemburg, we will trace how ideas relating to university reform, and to reform more generally, changed and were implemented in the course of the last two centuries, also in light of the most recent European university reform: the Bologna Process in 1999. Moreover, the course puts particular emphasis on the impact of philosophical ideas on politics, religion, and education, as well as on literature, visual arts, and architecture in Berlin past and present.

Recht und Politik

Dozentin/Dozent
Dr. José Henrique Fischel De Andrade
Sprachanforderung
Englisch B2
Zeit
Mittwoch, 16:00-18:30 (Online-Kurs)
Kursbeschreibung
This course examines the protection regime pertaining to refugees and other forced migrants. It gives special attention to the evolving set of legal norms, institutions, and procedures that have emerged from the international community’s resolve to protect refugees and forced migrants. The course adopts three complementary methodologies: virtual classroom lessons with the lecturer and students, individual and group exercises, assignments, and self-study. The virtual classroom sessions begin with an introduction to the international human rights and the asylum regimes, a historical perspective, and a review of the relevant concepts and definitions. It then continues with an analysis of the institutional and normative pillars of the global asylum regime, i.e. the UNHCR and the 1951 Refugee Convention, respectively. The virtual classroom lessons are complemented by individual and group exercises (such as presentations and case-studies), assignments, and self-study, all of which will further develop the knowledge of the content dealt with in the virtual classroom sessions.
Dozentin/Dozent
Betiel WASIHUN
Sprachanforderung
Englisch B2
Zeit
Dienstag, 12:30-15:00
Kursbeschreibung
What does it mean to live in a surveillance society? How does the digital age challenge questions revolving around privacy, individuality and freedom? When does surveillance as care tip over into surveillance as control? And how does the Stasi system of vigilance prefigure contemporary surveillance culture? This course will on the one hand examine the impact of surveillance on society by looking at the multifaceted ways technologies, societies and the arts interact; and on the other hand reflect on surveillance in a totalitarian context while comparing observation techniques in the GDR with contemporary surveillance methods. We will also explore how surveillance is represented in contemporary literature, film and popular culture. The course will map out important themes with regards to surveillance and its repercussions (e.g. visibility, identity, privacy and control). The course provides an overview of the interdisciplinary field of surveillance and covers the latest research in the following major areas: 1. Relationship between surveillance, power and social control; 2. Histories of Surveillance: GDR and the Stasi; 3. The concept of privacy; 4. Surveillance in the arts and popular culture.

Stadtforschung und Ökologie

Dozentin/Dozent
Sylvana JAHRE
Sprachanforderung
Englisch B2
Zeit
Donnerstag, 9:00-11:30
Kursbeschreibung
In this course we will deal with current urban struggles in Berlin, put them into a greater theoretical, historical and societal context and use concrete case studies for a better and more comprehensive understanding. The course covers topics such as housing struggles and policies, culture and arts in the city, gentrification, post-migration, unequal developments, and post-colonial thoughts on the city. Therefore students should have a general interest in urban policy issues and urban theory. The classical classroom formats are largely replaced by more interactive and innovative formats in combination with field trips. The final assignment is a written essay and a podcast about one or a combination of topics of the course. During the field trips student gather empirical audio material so that the podcast serves not only as an engagement with the encountered urban issues, but also as a reflection.
Dozentin/Dozent
Shelley ETKIN
Sprachanforderung
English B2
Zeit
Monday, 12:30-15:00
Kursbeschreibung
Gardens of Berlin: Transdisciplinary Ecology situates questions of planetary change through the city of Berlin as a diverse complex ecosystem, focusing on several urban gardens. Asking “what can a garden be?” the course proposes ecological thinking to engage with multiple disciplines informing the field of ecology including environmental, economic, social, political, artistic and spiritual to study relations between many human and nonhuman communities that compose each garden. As a digital course, sites will be introduced through virtual tours created in collaboration with local organizers from each of the projects, elaborating on their practices and contextualized with multi-media materials. In-person site visits or excursions may be included as the situation allows. Students will be supported to work autonomously and collaboratively in creative, critical, and reflective ways, embracing transdisciplinary, concluding the course by designing a speculative garden.